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Rewire Your Life: Looking Closely At Your Media Use

The U.S. leads the world in the amount of people regularly using the internet — yet, with all the information it brings into our lives, our media diet is typically pretty myopic. So says internet activist Ethan Zuckerman in his book, “Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection.” Zuckerman, who is also the director of MIT’s Center for Civic Media, posits that we can “rewire the world” by [ … ]

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Looking on the Bright Side

Neuroscientist Tali Sharot has found through her research that when it comes to optimism, the way our mind approaches — and even tricks — us is a function of survival. In her book, “The Optimism Bias: A Tour of the Irrationally Positive Brain” [ … ]

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Why A Television Anchor Turned to Meditation: A Q&A with Dan Harris

“Nightline” and weekend “Good Morning America” anchor Dan Harris realizes that meditation might not seem compatible with a career in hard-charging network news, but it’s been an invaluable tool for him to achieve both serenity and success. In his book, “10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works — a True Story,” [ … ]

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The Altruistic Brain: How We Are Naturally Good

It’s a debate as old as time. Are people instinctively good or bad by nature? Author Donald W. Pfaff, Ph.D., uses brain science to examine this age-old question. In “The Altruistic Brain: How We Get to Be Naturally Good,” Pfaff, a professor of neurobiology and behavior at Rockefeller University, theorizes that humans are good after all — in fact, they are even hardwired for altruism and caring for others. [ … ]

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Why Do We Perceive Time the Way We Do?

Time dictates our lives — we don’t have enough of it, we lose track of it, we need to manage it—yet most of us seldom consider how our brains process it. In “Time Warped: Unlocking the Mysteries of Time Perception,” author and psychology lecturer Claudia Hammond delves into how our perception of time can influence the way we think and behave. [ … ]

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What Buddha Can Do For Your Brain

Just as we can get better at playing tennis or cooking steak, we can get better at using our brains, re-training it so that we become happier, more resilient people, says neuropsychologist Rick Hanson, Ph.D., co-author (with Richard Mendius, M.D.) of the bestselling book “Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love & Wisdom.” Using principles at the intersection of psychology [ … ]