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(Anti-)Social Media: How Social Networks Affect Our Neural Networks

We like to think we are fairly rational and sensible beings, unable to be puppeteered by the internet, but neuroscientists are quickly unveiling how social media networks significantly affect our neural networks and motivate certain behaviors. One candidate in particular understood how to use this hook to his advantage, and built a campaign on rage instead of reason — garnering millions of supporters along the way. You might not have seen it coming, but the science of social media did. [ … ]


It’s All In Your Head? Controlling Pain Through the Mind-Body Connection

Calming a frantic person, whether he or she is dealing with worries, sadness or even chronic pain, is a pretty tall order. About one in three Americans — more than 116 million people — lives with long-lasting pain that never seems to go away. Here’s the thing: When pain becomes persistent, even after a person’s underlying problem has been treated or the catalytic injury has healed, it is considered chronic. [ … ]

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Love Me, Maybe: The Neuroscience of Unpredictable Love

The ups and downs of an unpredictable relationship — and, more so, an unpredictable partner — can be infuriating, irritating, and it plagues levelheaded males and females of all races and economic backgrounds. We like to think that we’re fairly rational and sensible when choosing a partner; that consistency, companionship, and commitment are leading our decision-making. [ … ]

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In Love With Love: The Science of Love Addiction

Have you ever stayed in a bad relationship or repeatedly returned to an ex even when you knew it wasn’t a good idea? When you’re in a committed relationship do you wonder if you’ve chosen the right one? Have you ever fantasized about someone from your past, thinking you should have kept them around? If you answered “yes” to any of the above, you just might be addicted to love. [ … ]

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I Can’t Decide! Why An Increase in Choices Decreases Our Happiness

Generally, the ability to choose is a good thing. It enables us to be the driver of our own destiny, fill our need for self-determination and express who we are to the world. Logic would assume that the more choices we have, the better the options, resulting in a greater satisfaction by getting exactly what we want; a secret to happiness. But as our options have continued to increase [ … ]

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The Violent Brain: Ingredients of a Mass Murderer

Researchers have posed the same questions and, with recent scientific advancements, have been able to note personality-based, neurological and even genetic-based commonalities in these violent individuals. Most experts will agree that there isn’t a single determining factor that creates a mass murderer, but when multiple triggers are combined, a killer is born. [ … ]

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The Neuroscience of Rationalizing Our Mistakes

Many of us have a hard time admitting when we’re wrong, but, even more so, we don’t like admitting that something about our logic (or belief systems) is flawed. So we rationalize, justify and sometimes fictionalize our stories, telling rose-colored lies to downplay our mistakes and make our choices and behaviors seem less faulty. [ … ]