aging

Can Exercise Pump Up “Mental Muscle”?

Physical education has long been an integral part of most educational curricula, but could it actually be a key conduit to academic success? That’s the hypothesis of New York University professor Wendy Suzuki, who introduced the highly popular class“Can Exercise Change Your Brain?”” in fall 2010. [ … ]

aging

The Importance of Novelty

Novelty, by definition, is anything that is new to us, and the experience of novelty can take many forms: meeting a new friend, learning a new skill, buying a new outfit, listening to new music, or traveling to a new environment. Most mammals, especially humans, naturally prefer novelty, so long as it does not come with some perceived threat. [ … ]

aging

It’s All In Your Head? Controlling Pain Through the Mind-Body Connection

Calming a frantic person, whether he or she is dealing with worries, sadness or even chronic pain, is a pretty tall order. About one in three Americans — more than 116 million people — lives with long-lasting pain that never seems to go away. Here’s the thing: When pain becomes persistent, even after a person’s underlying problem has been treated or the catalytic injury has healed, it is considered chronic. [ … ]

aging

Namaste: Yoga for the Aging Brain

For thousands of years, yoga has stood as one of the most important practices for spiritual discipline and transcendence of the ego. But today, yoga has made its way from out of the ashrams and into multiple neurological institutes and research centers throughout the world, being investigated as a new treatment approach to some of today’s most complicated neurophysiological conditions. [ … ]

aging

10 All-Natural Remedies for Pain Relief

Early on in my career as a professional fitness trainer, I realized that it was not the lack of will or desire that kept a large percentage of my clientele from reaching their fitness goals; it was the presence of chronic, debilitating pain. The most common types of pain limiting the client’s motion were neck and back pain, often related to injuries. [ … ]

aging

Aging with a Bilingual Brain

Adaptation of the brain could also be the reason older bilinguals with Alzheimer’s show fewer signs of cognitive malfunction than those who only speak one language. “The brain is more robust, its abilities and functionality are more distributed, so when Alzheimer’s begins to take effect, a bilingual’s brain is better able to adapt,” says Canadian psychologist Ellen Bialystok. [ … ]