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Know Your Brain: How The Left and Right Hemispheres Operate

In ancient Greece, left-brain creativity was attributed to the god Dionysus (the god of wine and drunkenness) while traits of reason and order were ascribed to Apollo — dualities of human nature that to this day are equally prized. The trouble is, this type of thinking is not entirely accurate. At least once in your life you’ve probably described yourself as either left- or right-brained [ … ]

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Are We What We Eat?

The world is full of different cuisines and thousands of different meals. Yet when we reduce them to their essence, there are just a handful of ingredients that our bodies absolutely need to survive. These basic molecules come in a series of groups we’re all familiar with — carbohydrates, fat, protein — each class of molecule is very important for the way our bodies work. So, what to choose? [ … ]

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Assimilated: The Clout of Cults on Identity

As he told it, Ron lived epic. As a youth, he befriended Calvin Coolidge Jr., the son of the president, became a full blood brother of the Pikuni tribe, and won a string of navy battles in the Atlantic and Pacific theaters respectively during World War II. After the war, he pursued his love of writing full time and established a new religion. [ … ]

aging

Aging with a Bilingual Brain

Adaptation of the brain could also be the reason older bilinguals with Alzheimer’s show fewer signs of cognitive malfunction than those who only speak one language. “The brain is more robust, its abilities and functionality are more distributed, so when Alzheimer’s begins to take effect, a bilingual’s brain is better able to adapt,” says Canadian psychologist Ellen Bialystok. [ … ]

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Your Brain On A Diet

A diet is a prescribed selection of foods. In the West, it’s long been advocated as a way of losing weight. Other benefits touted are improved health, sleep, circulation, and even a longer life. As consumers, we are constantly bombarded with new diets. But what do these plans do to our brains? [ … ]

aging

Dementia: The Rising Dragon

Joyce had always been at the top of her class, from middle school through college. As a young woman in the 1950s, she was defiant toward the belief that women were second-class citizens, only good for staying at home with the kids. Due to her determination, she attended the best law school in the country [ … ]

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The Odor of Your Dreams

I woke up last week convinced that I could smell coffee. My husband, the coffee drinker in our household, was away for business and my 20-month-old son hasn’t yet discovered the substance so it seemed odd that there would be the familiar comforting aroma in the air. Within seconds of my waking up [ … ]

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Syntonics: Colored Light Therapy for Balance

It is estimated that over 5 percent of people in the United States may have winter depression, and 10 to 20 percent suffer from a condition related to changes in the amount of daylight called seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. One possible remedy to help the afflicted through this difficult time is syntonics. [ … ]